Follow by Email

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Power of Thoughts: Tips on Making Dissociation Productive and Positive


Dissociation is the most creative survival power the human mind possesses. It can help a person get through horrible situations, emotional hurt, physical pain, and life-threatening experiences.

Dissociation, when enforced, allows a person to not be aware of the threat which is happening in the moment and escape overwhelming physical and emotional hurt and pain. Yet it is so misunderstood and the helping professionals have designated this PTSD symptom as negative and a character weakness. Nothing is further from the truth.

Why does everything associated with survival viewed as negative? Once out of abuse, trauma or combat situations or environments and the survival aspect is no longer needed, can't  post traumatic symptoms be looked at as productive and positive? 

Dissociation is a normal reaction and natural beneficial reaction to surviving and after-effect of experiencing abuse, trauma or combat situation(s). Dissociation is a protective adaptive skill that allows anyone to avoid hurt or pain mentally, emotionally, physically or living in an untenable environment as well as a situation.

By definition, dissociation is a mental process of disconnecting from one's thoughts, feelings, memories, and/or sense of identity when the whole is threatened with harm, hurt and pain on a mental, emotional, physical or spiritual level. 

Therefore, dissociation is the ability to an instinctively, and creatively focus to mentally / emotionally block out the present in order to escape and survive what is happening in reality. Probably, since abusive, traumatic, and combat experiences are viewed as negative, horrible and overwhelming the resulting symptoms are seen as negative, and terrible. 

Dissociation is very misunderstood by many professionals, the general public, and confusing to survivors.

Tips on Making Dissociation Productive and Positive

Dissociation does not have to be negative. When understood, dissociation can be a positive and productive adaptative skill. Actually, dissociation is the ability to divert focus inward, adapt, and adjust quickly in order to survive an overwhelming and possible life threating situation.

Dissociation can be used as a productive focus tool and when combined with mindfulness for task completion, studying for class work in school, for sports and job tasks.

To make dissociation positive and productive you have to change your mindset and practice it a lot.
You have to change your mindset from viewing dissociation as a pathology symptom to seeing dissociation as productive and as an advantage.

Here are the symptoms of dissociation and then how you can change each to be positive and productive.

 Feeling of being disconnected from yourself

    (Make your experience productive and positive by reconnecting with yourself and increasing
     your relationship with yourself)

 Problems with handling intense emotions

    (Make your experience productive and positive by embracing your emotions, instead of ignoring them or disconnecting from them. It is better to learn how to experience your emotions rather than running from or numbing them. Emotions are only painful if you believe they are.)

 Sudden and unexpected shifts in mood – for example, feeling very sad for no reason

    (Make your experience productive and positive by learning your triggers. Recognizing
     your triggers reduce your inappropriate response to them and how to neutralize their
     power and influence over you.)

 Depression or anxiety problems, or both

    (Make your experience productive and positive by breathing exercises, meditation, mindfulness, being in the moment and learning intuitive breathing to reduce depression and anxiety.)

 Feeling as though the world is distorted or not real

     (Make your experience productive and positive by checking out your environment by asking yourself these questions. What is my sense of what is happening? Then determine if your sense is real or unreal? Is it true or false? Is it productive or unproductive? Your answers will help you focus and achieve clarity in your thoughts.)

 Memory problems such as flashbacks, forgetting important personal information and significant memory lapses

     (Make your experience productive by journaling thoughts and feelings and taking notes on your memories as they come to you. Take your information and check them against your history as you know it to be)

Other cognitive (thought-related) problems such as concentration problems, like forgetting important personal information or wandering thoughts

   (Make your experience positive and productive by remaining mindful and connected to the moment. Find a point in the present that will assist you focusing your attention on what you are doing, therefore, enhancing the ability to stay present.)

Feeling compelled to behave in a certain way

   (Make your experience positive and productive by reducing impulsiveness, sense of acting and being mindful. Ask if what I am doing will help?)

Identity confusion – for example, behaving in a way that anyone else would normally find offensive or abhorrent.

   (Make productive by checking your beliefs and change the one which is harmful. Rescript your identity into the identity you want. Your traumatic experience changed your identity, so it is your power and right to change it.)

⦁ Feel as though negative attitude is the default

   (Make your experience positive and productive by deciding an appropriate mindset toward dissociation.)

Subtypes of Dissociation

There are two subtypes of Dissociation

There are subtypes of dissociation many mistaken as dissociation. Both of these subtypes of dissociation are byproducts of experiencing intense anxiety as a result of experiencing abuse, trauma, or combat events. These both cause self-judging of yourself and your environment. Intense anxiety, doubt, and second guessing result from living through life threatening experiences. 

A good thing to know is if you are in a state of self-judgment, you are not in a state of self. Therefore losing connection with yourself and your surroundings. Both subtypes can develop as a result lesser degree of experiences and without the development of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.TS

1. Depersonalization

Recent research evaluating the relationship between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and dissociation has suggested that there is a dissociative subtype of PTSD, defined primarily by symptoms of derealization (i.e., feeling as if the world is not real) and depersonalization (i.e., feeling as if you not real).

An ‘out-of-body’ or depersonalization experience during which individuals often see themselves observing their own body from above has the capacity to create the perception that ‘this is not happening to me’ and is typically accompanied by an attenuation of the emotional experience.

2. Derealization

Similarly, states of derealization during which individuals experience that ‘things are not real; it is just a dream’ create the perception that ‘this is not really happening to me’ and are often associated with the experience of decreased emotional intensity or emotional numbness.

Tips to Make Dissociation Positive and Productive 

The following 10 questions can help you further overcome dissociation. Recognizing your mind and body reactions can reduce the power, and of the dissociation. You can become more mindful, more intuitive, more positive, and make better decisions to be more productive. Your answers can help you to be more compassionate and create a positiveness toward yourself.

1. Ask yourself "What is your mind telling you?"

2. What is your body telling you?

3. What is your feeling telling you?

4. What is your intuition telling you?

5. What are you running from?

6. What are your top 5 fears about myself?

(Break down the top 5 to top 3 and then which is the most important fear? Then evaluate by answering – Is my biggest fear true or false? Is it real or delusional? What can I do right now to change it?)

7. What are your top 5 fears about life?

(Break down the top 5 to top 3. Then which is the biggest fear? Then evaluate by answering – Is my biggest fear - true or false? Is it - real or delusional? What can I do right now to change it?)

8. What are your top 5 core beliefs about myself?

(Break down the top 5 to top 3. Then which is the most important core belief? Then evaluate by answering – Is my biggest core belief - true or false? Is it - real or delusional? What can I do right now to change it?)

9. What are your top 5 core beliefs about life?

(Break down the top 5 to top 3. Then which is the most important core belief? Then evaluate by answering – Is my biggest core belief - true or false? Is it - real or delusional? What can I do right now to change it?)

10. How can I take what is going on inside of me or in my environment and make it productive?

Takeaway

Making dissociation positive and productive can be achieved after you are no longer are in an abusive, traumatic, or combative situations or surroundings.

           Coach Bill